Ian Tomlinson – ‘Didn’t die of heart attack’, G20 assault cop ‘quizzed under caution for manslaughter’

Following the Twitter traffic and MSM breaking news tickers, the second autopsy on Ian Tomlinson has found that he died not of a heart attack but from ‘abdominal haemmorhage’.

It’s also being reported that the police officer seen in video assaulting Ian Tomlinson shortly before he died has been interviewed under caution on suspicion of manslaughter.

Credible links as I chase them up.

ETA:

BBC: G20 death was not heart attack

A police officer has been interviewed under caution for manslaughter after a new post-mortem examination overturned the cause of Ian Tomlinson’s death.

The newspaper-seller was struck and pushed over by a police officer during G20 protests on 1 April in the City.

Now a fresh examination has found he died of abdominal bleeding, not a heart attack, as originally thought.

Lawyers for the family said the new post-mortem test raised the likelihood of a manslaughter charge.

In its statement, the Coroner’s Court said the inquest had looked at the first post-mortem examination carried out after Mr Tomlinson collapsed and died on the evening of 1 April.

That examination, carried out by Dr Freddy Patel, concluded Mr Tomlinson had diseased heart and liver and a substantial amount of blood in the abdominal cavity.

“His provisional interpretation of his findings was that the cause of death was coronary artery disease,” said the statement.

“A subsequent post-mortem examination was conducted by another consultant forensic pathologist, Dr Nat Cary, instructed by the IPCC and by solicitors acting for the family of the late Mr Tomlinson.

“Dr Cary’s opinion is that the cause of death was abdominal haemorrhage. The cause of the haemorrhage remains to be ascertained.

“Dr Cary accepts that there is evidence of coronary atherosclerosis but states that in his opinion its nature and extent is unlikely to have contributed to the cause of death.”

The statement concluded that both the opinions remained provisional and subject to further investigations and tests.

In a response, the Independent Police Complaints Commission said: “Following the initial results of the second post mortem, a Metropolitan police officer has been interviewed under caution for the offence of manslaughter as part of an ongoing inquiry into the death of Ian Tomlinson.”

Paul King, Mr Tomlinson’s step-son, said “First we were told that there had been no contact with the police, then we were told that he died of a heart attack.

“Now we know that he was violently assaulted by a police officer and died from internal bleeding. As time goes on we hope that the full truth about how Ian died will be made known.”

Jules Carey of Tuckers, the family’s solicitor, said the family had known about the results of the second post-mortem for the past week – but had reluctantly agreed to remain silent while the IPCC continued its investigations.

“The findings of Dr Nat Cary significantly increase the likelihood that the officer will now face the more serious charge of manslaughter,” said Mr Carey.

“The IPCC opposed the disclosure of Dr Cary’s findings until they satisfied themselves that it would not prejudice their investigation of the officer.

“It is of some comfort to the family that the record is now being put straight, but they hope that the IPCC investigation will be expedited and thorough, and that there will be a prompt referral to the CPS for charge,” he added.

The IPCC launched a full-scale investigation of the death after video footage revealed the officer’s contact with Mr Tomlinson, despite earlier reports to the contrary. The officer involved has been suspended from duty.

The news of the second post-mortem’s results came as the Metropolitan Police remained under pressure over the G20 strategy. Another officer from the force’s Territorial Support Group has also been suspended after a woman alleged she was hit on the second day of the protests.

Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson has called in the Inspectorate of Constabularies to look at policing tactics on the day and how to handle future large protests.

In a statement, the Metropolitan Police said it wished to reiterate its “sincere regret” over Mr Tomlinson’s death but would not comment on the post-mortem while the IPCC continued its investigations.

BBC News

Telegraph: Ian Tomlinson G20 protests death: police office faces manslaughter charge

A police officer is facing a manslaughter charge over the death of Ian Tomlinson at the G20 protests in London after a second post mortem found that he died from internal bleeding.

Mr Tomlinson, 47, collapsed and died minutes after being knocked down by an officer on April 1. An initial post mortem carried out suggested he died from heart disease, but a second examination said that the cause of death was “abdominal haemorrhage”.

Medical sources said that this could be caused by an injury sustained through trauma such as a fall or a blow to the stomach.

A Metropolitan police constable seen in video footage appearing to shove Mr Tomlinson to the ground from behind, minutes before he collapsed, has been interviewed under caution over accusations of manslaughter.

A spokesman for the Independent Police Complaints Commissioner said: “Following the initial results of the second post mortem, a Metropolitan Police Officer has been interviewed under caution for the offence of manslaughter as part of an on-going inquiry into the death of Ian Tomlinson.”

The officer, from the Met’s Territorial Support Group, has been suspended from duty and signed off sick after apparently suffering a panic attack when the story and footage emerged.

The findings call into question the first post mortem, which was carried out by Dr Freddy Patel, two days after his death but before the footage of Mr Tomlinson’s last moments emerged.

The second examination was carried out by Dr Nat Carey, one of Britain’s most eminent forensic pathologists, on behalf of the IPCC.

Mr Tomlinson’s family solicitor, Jules Carey, said: “The video footage of the unprovoked and vicious assault on Ian by the police officer would easily justify charges of assault being brought against the officer. The findings of Dr. Nat Carey significantly increase the likelihood that the officer will now face the more serious charge of manslaughter”.

“The family have been aware of the findings of the second pathology report for a week and have had to endure the holding back of this information despite continuing reports in the press that Ian died of a heart attack.

“The IPCC opposed the disclosure of Dr Carey’s findings until they satisfied themselves that it would not prejudice their investigation of the officer. It is of some comfort to the family that the record is now being put straight, but they hope that the IPCC investigation will be expedited and thorough, and that there will be a prompt referral to the CPS for charge.”

Paul King, Mr Tomlinson’s stepson, said: “First we were told that there had been no contact with the police, then we were told that he died of a heart attack; now we know that he was violently assaulted by a police officer and died from internal bleeding. As time goes on we hope that the full truth about how Ian died will be made known”.

Sir Paul Stephenson this week ordered a top-level review of riot policing and admitted his concerns over the “clearly disturbing” images to have emerged.

Telegraph

Times: Ian Tomlinson died of internal bleeding, not heart attack, second post-mortem shows

A second post-mortem examination has sensationally revealed that the newspaper seller hit by a policeman at the recent G20 protests died from internal bleeding, and not a heart attack as previously thought.

Ian Tomlinson died minutes after the incident involving a Territorial Support Group officer from the Metropolitan Police, which was captured on video.

In light of today’s development, the officer has now been questioned under caution for manslaughter, the Independent Police Complaints Commission said today.

The first post mortem was carried out within two days of the incident, at the beginning of this month, and the cause of death was originally established as a heart attack.

However, a second examination was ordered after footage of the incident emerged on the internet. This was conducted by Dr Nat Carey, one of Britain’s most eminent forensic pathologists, last week, on behalf of both Mr Tomlinson’s family and the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

In a preliminary report, Dr Carey reported that the cause of death was abdominal haemorrhage. The cause of the haemorrhage remains to be ascertained.

A statement from the City of London Coroners’ Court said that Dr Carey accepts that there is evidence of heart disease but states that in his opinion “its nature and extent is unlikely to have contributed to the cause of death”.

Jules Carey of Tuckers, the family’s solicitor stated that “the video footage of the unprovoked and vicious assault on Ian by the police officer would easily justify charges of assault being brought against the officer”.

“The findings of Dr Nat Carey significantly increase the likelihood that the officer will now face the more serious charge of manslaughter.

“The family have been aware of the findings of the second pathology report for a week and have had to endure the holding back of this information despite continuing reports in the press that Ian died of a heart attack.

“The IPCC opposed the disclosure of Dr Carey’s findings until they satisfied themselves that it would not prejudice their investigation of the officer. It is of some comfort to the family that the record is now being put straight, but they hope that the IPCC investigation will be expedited and thorough, and that there will be a prompt referral to the CPS for charge.”

Metropolitan Police released a new statement this afternoon, reiterating its ‘sincere regret’ in relation to the death of Ian Tomlinson.

Paul King on behalf of the family said: “First we were told that there had been no contact with the police, then we were told that he died of a heart attack; now we know that he was violently assaulted by a police officer and died from internal bleeding. As time goes on we hope that the full truth about how Ian died will be made known”.

The statement from the Coroners Court said that the opinions of both consultant pathologists were provisional. “Both agree that their final opinions must await the outcome of further investigations and tests. These are likely to take some time. The IPCC’s investigation into the death of Ian Tomlinson is ongoing.”

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, said: “People in London and across the country have been deeply disturbed by the death of Ian Tomlinson.

“There must now be a fast and transparent conclusion to the IPCC investigation, with the full and urgent co-operation of all involved.

“The Metropolitan Police receive and deserve the overwhelming support of the people of London, but the family of Ian Tomlinson need answers and so do Londoners”.

Times

ETA:

Independent: G20 victim ‘died from haemorrhage’

The police officer suspended following the death of Ian Tomlinson during G20 protests has been questioned on suspicion of manslaughter, the Independent Police Complaints Commission said today.

He was questioned after a second post-mortem examination found Mr Tomlinson died from an “abdominal haemorrhage” and not a heart attack.

A spokesman for the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) said: “Following the initial results of the second post-mortem, a Metropolitan Police officer has been interviewed under caution for the offence of manslaughter as part of an ongoing inquiry into the death of Ian Tomlinson.”

Pathologist Dr Nat Cary, who carried out a second post-mortem at the request of the IPCC and Mr Tomlinson’s family, rejected the conclusions of the first.

He accepted that while there was evidence that Mr Tomlinson suffered hardening of the arteries in his heart, it was not serious enough to kill him.

In a statement, a spokesman for City of London Coroner’s Court said: “Dr Cary’s opinion is that the cause of death was abdominal haemorrhage. The cause of the haemorrhage remains to be ascertained.

“Dr Cary accepts that there is evidence of coronary atherosclerosis but states that in his opinion its nature and extent is unlikely to have contributed to the cause of death.”

The first post-mortem, carried out by Dr Freddy Patel, concluded that Mr Tomlinson died from coronary artery disease.

The statement said: “Dr F Patel made a number of findings of fact including descriptions of a number of injuries and of diseased organs including the heart and liver.

“He found a substantial amount of blood in the abdominal cavity. His provisional interpretation of his findings was that the cause of death was coronary artery disease.

“The opinions of both consultant pathologists are provisional and both agree that their final opinions must await the outcome of further investigations and tests. These are likely to take some time.”

A spokesman for the Metropolitan Police said the force was cooperating fully with the IPCC and would “proactively” give it any relevant information.

He said: “The Metropolitan Police Service wishes to reiterate its sincere regret in relation to the death of Ian Tomlinson.

“Our thoughts are with his family, and all those affected by this tragedy.

“As an independent investigation by the Independent Police Complaints Commission into the circumstances surrounding police contact with Mr Tomlinson is ongoing, we are unable to comment specifically on the findings of the post-mortem.

“We continue to cooperate fully with the IPCC and proactively provide any information that may assist them. We await the findings of the investigation.”

Lindsey German, convener of the Stop The War Coalition, said: “This news is very disturbing and emphasises the need for a full and open public inquiry into recent aggressive policing of legal protests.”

Mr Tomlinson’s son Paul King said: “First we were told that there had been no contact with the police, then we were told that he died of a heart attack. Now we know that he was violently assaulted by a police officer and died from internal bleeding.

“As time goes on, we hope that the full truth about how Ian died will be made known.”

The family’s solicitor Jules Carey said they had been aware of the results of the second post-mortem for a week.

They had held the information back because the IPCC initially opposed its publication, fearing it would prejudice its investigation, he said.

He said the family hoped there would be a “prompt referral” to the Crown Prosecution Service for charge.

He said: “The video footage of the unprovoked and vicious assault on Ian by the police officer would easily justify charges of assault being brought against the officer.

“The findings of Dr Nat Cary significantly increase the likelihood that the officer will now face the more serious charge of manslaughter.

“The family have been aware of the findings of the second pathology report for a week and have had to endure the holding back of this information despite continuing reports in the press that Ian died of a heart attack.

“The IPCC opposed the disclosure of Dr Cary’s findings until they satisfied themselves that it would not prejudice their investigation of the officer.

“It is of some comfort to the family that the record is now being put straight, but they hope that the IPCC investigation will be expedited and thorough, and that there will be a prompt referral to the CPS for charge.”

London mayor Boris Johnson said: “People in London and across the country have been deeply disturbed by the death of Ian Tomlinson.

“Our first thoughts must be with his family as they mourn his loss. No one can doubt that the Metropolitan Police faced a huge challenge in securing the G20 summit.

“The police do an excellent job of making safe the 4,500 events and demonstrations that take place in London every year.

“But there must now be a fast and transparent conclusion to the IPCC investigation, with the full and urgent co-operation of all involved.

“Sir Paul Stephenson has rightly called in the IPCC and asked the HMIC (Inspectorate of Constabulary) to review the policing of demonstrations of this kind.

“It is vital that everyone takes care not to prejudice either the ongoing IPCC investigation or indeed any future criminal proceedings that may arise.

“The Metropolitan Police receive and deserve the overwhelming support of the people of London, but the family of Ian Tomlinson need answers, and so do Londoners.”

Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, said: “This new evidence will only add to the distress of Mr Tomlinson’s family and further demonstrates how citizens and journalists have pressured the authorities into action.

“It increases the importance of the IPCC investigation and the Met Commissioner’s broader review of policing tactics. We all owe it to Mr Tomlinson and his loved ones to ensure that this tragic death was not in vain.”

In the immediate aftermath of Mr Tomlinson’s collapse, Scotland Yard said officers trying to help him were pelted with plastic bottles and other missiles thrown by protesters.

Video footage then emerged of an officer striking the 47-year-old newspaper salesman with his baton before shoving him violently to the ground.

An amateur cameraman caught the policeman’s actions on camera as thousands of protesters converged outside the Bank of England.

The officer, a member of the Territorial Support Group, was suspended last Friday at the request of the IPCC.

Liberal Democrat home affairs spokesman Chris Huhne said: “This is an alarming finding. It suggests that Mr Tomlinson’s treatment by the police officer caught on video may have been the final contributing factor in his death.

“These findings put further pressure on the IPCC to investigate this matter with all urgency.”

Independent

ETA:

Guardian: G20 officer questioned on suspicion of Ian Tomlinson manslaughter

The police officer suspended following the death of Ian Tomlinson during the G20 protests has been questioned on suspicion of manslaughter after a second postmortem examination showed the newspaper vendor did not die of a heart attack.

The findings released today show Tomlinson, who was thrown to the ground by a Met officer during the protests, died from an abdominal haemorrhage.

The dramatic shift led the Independent Police Complaints Commission to confirm that the officer under investigation in connection with the alleged assault had been questioned about manslaughter.

Tomlinson’s family believe today’s findings make a manslaughter charge against the officer more likely. His son Paul King said: “First we were told that there had been no contact with the police, then we were told that he died of a heart attack; now we know that he was violently assaulted by a police officer and died from internal bleeding. As time goes on we hope that the full truth about how Ian died will be made known.”

Tomlinson, 47, collapsed and died moments after being attacked from behind by a Metropolitan police territorial support group (TSG) officer on 1 April at about 7.20pm. The constable, whose identifying badge number was not on display, has not been identified.

He had been trying to make his way home from work when he was confronted by police, hit with a baton and thrown to the ground. Initially, police said he had previously had no contact with the police, and alleged that medics were impeded from helping him as “a number of missiles – believed to be bottles – were being thrown at them”.

A couple of days later, the Guardian published a photograph of him lying at the feet of police officers, along with the testimony of three witnesses who described him being hit with a baton or thrown to the ground by police. The IPCC criticised the Guardian for upsetting Tomlinson’s family and briefed other journalists that there was “nothing in the story” that he had been assaulted by an officer.

It was only when video footage emerged that the officer responsible was suspended and a criminal inquiry launched.

An initial postmortem, by the Home Office pathologist Dr Freddy Patel, found that Tomlinson died after suffering a heart attack. But Dr Nat Cary, the pathologist who carried out a second postmortem at the request of the IPCC and Tomlinson’s family, concluded that while there was evidence Tomlinson suffered hardening of the arteries in his heart, it was not serious enough to kill him.

Jules Carey, of Tuckers, the solicitor representing Tomlinson’s family, said today that “the video footage of the unprovoked and vicious assault on Ian by the police officer would easily justify charges of assault being brought against the officer. The findings of Dr Nat Cary significantly increase the likelihood that the officer will now face the more serious charge of manslaughter.”

He said the family had been aware of the findings of the second pathology report for a week and had been forced to endure “continuing reports in the press that Ian died of a heart attack”.

Carey added: “The IPCC opposed the disclosure of Dr Cary’s findings until they satisfied themselves that it would not prejudice their investigation of the officer. It is of some comfort to the family that the record is now being put straight, but they hope that the IPCC investigation will be expedited and thorough, and that there will be a prompt referral to the CPS for charge.”

A statement from the City of London coroners court said: “Dr Cary’s opinion is that the cause of death was abdominal haemorrhage. The cause of the haemorrhage remains to be ascertained. Dr Cary accepts that there is evidence of coronary atherosclerosis but states that in his opinion its nature and extent is unlikely to have contributed to the cause of death.”

The IPCC has previously said CCTV footage showed Tomlinson walking up King William Street after 7pm and approaching one of several police cordons opposite the Bank of England.

Denis O’Connor, the chief inspector of constabulary, who will carry out the review, said this week he would examine all aspects of the Met’s public order policing, including techniques such as kettling – the containment of thousands of protesters inside police cordons for hours at a time.

O’Connor has been called in by the Met commissioner, Sir Paul Stephenson, who said the move had been prompted by concern over policing of the G20 protests. The Met will scour its own surveillance footage of the demonstrations in the City of London to search for further evidence of police misconduct.

Guardian

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2 responses to “Ian Tomlinson – ‘Didn’t die of heart attack’, G20 assault cop ‘quizzed under caution for manslaughter’

  1. Pingback: EDO Decommissioners solidarity & related events « Prisoner Support Bristol ABC

  2. “The Met will scour its own surveillance footage of the demonstrations in the City of London to search for further evidence of police misconduct.”

    Mmmmm.
    Being honest for once?

    scour 1 |skou(ə)r|
    verb [ trans. ]
    1 clean or brighten the surface of (something) by rubbing it hard, typically with an abrasive or detergent : he scoured the bathtub.
    • remove (dirt or unwanted matter) by rubbing in such a way : use an electric toothbrush to scour off plaque | [ intrans. ] I’ve spent all day mopping and scouring.
    • (of water or a watercourse) make (a channel or pool) by flowing forcefully over something and removing soil or rock : a stream came crashing through a narrow cavern to scour out a round pool below.

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