Category Archives: Bristol Shitty Council

Still bitter about that council tax court hearing…

The Bristolian is back! (slight return)

The Bristolian returns (again)

So, it seems that Bristol’s “favourite muck-raking scandal sheet”, The Bristolian, has returned (again).

Now in its third iteration (lovingly retconned to v4.0 through a quick history lesson that drags in James Acland’s 19th century anti-establishment rag serendipitously of the same name), there’s also a website to back it up, plus Twitter account and Facebook page. How terribly modern!

One gripe: first issue seems to be rather council-focused (I know, it does say ‘CRAP COUNCIL SPECIAL’ in big letters on the cover) – hopefully they shall be casting their net a little wider with future issues.

Anyway, there’s stuff on outgoing council capo Graham Sims getting a sweetheart deal from new Mayor George Ferguson, a new crap legal supremo replaces old crap legal supremo, and some righteous anger at adventure playgrounds & youth centres being dumped as large swathes of our public play facilities and services are privatised…

There’s a growing list of places to pick up paper copies (I suspect it will take a while to get it out though, so might be best to contact the Bristolian people first before trekking out).

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Bristol City Council ‘consultation’ on care services: “Keeping things as they are is not an option”

In line with central government’s desire to strip away services which provide a safety net for the most vulnerable amongst us whilst financially benefiting the richest in society, Bristol City Council is “seeking your views on the future of care services in Bristol”.

Hey, groovy! It’s a meaningless consultation exercise with predetermined parameters!

Reductions in funding for local services, coupled with the fact we are living longer – mean keeping things as they are is not an option. The changes being proposed reflect the demand for people to make their own choices about tailoring their care (personalisation). This will see the council becoming more of a commissioner of care services rather than a provider.

Consultation runs until the end of Feb and looks at day and residential care services.

Join the online debate on ASK Bristol

Cabinet Member Jon Rogers is reading all your comments and has joined the online discussion.

Perhaps it is less a case of “becoming a commissioner of care services” and more about providing “don’t care services”?

Of course, any similarity between the Liberal Democrats (party of national government) and the Liberal Democrats (party of city government) is of course a coincidence. It’s some other bugger’s fault cuts ‘have to be made’!

If you want to add your voice to the (obviously not pre-determined) consultation on either day care or residential care, you have until the end of February.

Obviously whatever necessary changes are ultimately put into effect it will be for the good of Harry, England and Saint Geo- sorry, I mean Bristol and the nation. Sacrifices have to be made, and if that means your Aunt Nelly has to get bashed about a bit in a private ‘home’ run by some carpetbagger who once threw a bung sideways at some snivelling party apparatchik’s election campaign, so be it. Think of the national interest!

Just make sure you and your loved ones never get sick, laid off or unable to pay your rent. Otherwise they’ll be going the same way as Aunt Nelly.

ETA:

Reminds me of the “there is no fifth option” warning trotted out during the trial of welfare-to-work prototype Project Work in the 1990s. There is always another option – where there is the political will backed up by action.

…But when will we get the Festivals, Community Arts & Film Manager fly-on-the-wall documentary?

Following on from last week’s post noting that Bristol City Council is advertising for a new arts boss (“helping grow Bristol’s headline artists of tomorrow“) for ten grand more than the salary offered to social workers overseeing foster care, with somewhat accidental synchronicity this Tuesday the Beeb started screening Protecting Our Children, a new series following social workers around Bristol.

The first episode – Knowle West was it? – was pretty hard viewing. Bristol 24-7 has a guest post by one of the social workers who appears in the programme.

Whatever your feelings about social workers, it is certainly interesting to see how they work.

Bristol: A tale of one city, two worlds

The LLF spotted these two contrasting jobs on the Bristol City Council website…

Festivals, Community Arts and Film Manager

  • Reference: 23103
  • Department: Corporate Services
  • Working Hours: Full time
  • Employment Type: Permanent
  • Salary: £35,430 – £38,042
  • Closing Date: 08 February, 2012
  • Location: Council House

 

In community arts, our work ranges from promoting dance projects to opening up empty shops as temporary arts venues – and to achieving benefits in terms of health, community development and regeneration, as well as helping grow Bristol’s headline artists of tomorrow. Our festivals team is behind small and large events across the city – none larger than our annual Harbour Festival, which in 2011 celebrated its 40th year with crowds of over 250,000. Our events licensing team has made Bristol the official ‘street party capital of England’ with more external events here than any other city council area (over 400 last year alone). Our film office team are the people who make it easy for TV and film crews to film in the city, bringing in millions of pounds to the local economy.

Social Worker

  • Reference: 23100
  • Department: Children and Young Peoples Services
  • Working Hours: Full time
  • Employment Type: Permanent
  • Salary: £25,472 – £30,851
  • Closing Date: 08 February, 2012
  • Location: Redfield

 

This is an exciting opportunity for a qualified Social Worker to join a well-established and experienced team working in the fields of long-term, short-term, kinship and private fostering. You will be required to supervise and support foster carers, undertake fostering assessments and annual reviews and present your reports to the fostering panel.

It’s always good to see what priorities we’re subject to.

Just what is Junket Janke hiding? The mystery of Bristol council’s Eurocities 2010 gravy train

For some reason Bristol City Council has been dragging its feet over a Freedom of Information request relating to a trip to Zaragoza for the Eurocities conference back in early November by council leader Barbara ‘Junket’ Janke, her £72,000 per year ‘director of place-making’ Mike Bennett, and possibly other hangers-on.

With the suspicion that this little four day jaunt to sunny Spain cost a pretty penny or two and serves little to no purpose at a time when the city council is threatening massive cutbacks to services and jobs across Bristol, it seems curious that the council has not been keener to wheel out its no doubt entirely valid and deep-ranging justifications – I am sure we are all waiting with excitement for old favourites like “value for money”, “strategic partnerships” and even “post-industrial destination economy”.

But, despite being legally obliged to respond within a month, the council still has yet to even acknowledge the original FoI request, so requester Steve Woods has politely resubmitted it:

Dear Bristol City Council,

I have not yet received a reply, or even the courtesy of an acknowledgment, to my FoI request for information on the visit of Barbara Janke and the Director of Place to the Eurocities 2010 conference
in Zaragoza, Spain.

A full reply should have been received by 6th November and Bristol City Council is therefore in breach of the law by not having responded within the stipulated term.

I set out below verbatim the text of my original request for your information, just in case it has slipped into oblivion down the back of the municipal filing cabinet.

“Dear Bristol City Council,

I understand that the Leader of the Council, Barbara Janke, and the Director of Place recently attended the Eurocities 2010 conference in Zaragoza, Spain.

My queries under the FoI Act are as follows:

1. Did any other representatives of Bristol City Council attend this conference, apart from those mentioned above?

2. What was the overall cost (registration, travel, accommodation, etc.) to the City Council of its representatives attending the Eurocities 2010 conference.

Yours faithfully,

Steve Woods”

Can you please advise by return just what the current position is with this request, as well as when I can expect a reply.

Yours faithfully,

Steve Woods

Exuding the sense of opaque entitlement often found with a certain kind of ‘knowledge economy’ technocrat, somewhat cantankerous servant of the city Bennett – formerly the chief self-facilitating node at Bristol Media – has not even mentioned the Eurocities event on his blog since October (before it took place!), much less than offered any insights on what ‘the team’ learned there to us, the Great Unwashed of the city… Could this be because he and Babs got up to some unsavoury Spanish practices of their own at the taxpayer’s expense out there?